About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CNNW 50
LANGUAGE
English 50
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to com
into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in may proclaiming his support. here he is with bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, former republican senate leader is a long-time supporter of disability rights and a strong advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote he came to the senate chamber 89 years old frail in his wheelchair. he thought it was tha
with the -- with what happened in congress yesterday, the lack of support in the united states senate for the u.n. but the u.n. process really has to go forward and has to be the leader on syria. >> i just don't think it's helpful to americans when so many senior politicians trash the u.n. you know? it's the united nations. and actually, it's better for america. >> absolutely. >> the united nations takes a lot of the work on the ground in these places. >> you're absolutely right. but there's human rights abuses that are exploding all over the world. and one that we're working very hard on right now is in uganda. there's anti-homosexuality bill that would make homosexual acts punishment by the death penalty. >> completely outrageous. >> it is. and the speaker of the house there said she's going to deliver this bill as a christmas present. so, we have 2 1/2 weeks to stop that bill right now. >> imagine. it's disgusting, isn't it? >> it certainly is. as people across this state, we're in new york state. you don't need a passport to work on human rights. right here, we're working on the farm workers
and not in syria? a lot of people asked me, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. i think from the administration's point of view they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq-type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out of syria while senators mccain and lieberman said thursday that the u.s. must get involved. what is the fear if the u.s. does get involved? >> well, precisely that. that they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talking about putting american boots on the ground or any other boots on the ground. the question is, can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most sort of seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women and children have been slaughtered and after nearly
the u.s. passed 22 years ago. but 38 u. rep u.n. treaty leaving it five votes short of ratification. not even a rare visit by former republican senator bob dole who just before the vote made a difference. he's 89, appeared frail this his wheelchair and disabled from war injuries, came to the chamber to show support for this treaty. rick santorum led the charge against the treaty. he and some other republicans warned it would jeopardize u.s. sovereignty and personal freedoms. listen. >> the problem is, there's a provision in this international law which we would be adopting if the senate ratifies this that puts the state, the state in the position of determining what i in the best interest of a disabled child. >> i simply cannot support a tr that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constant looming threat of state interference. >> the treaty could be used to interfere with the ability of parents with disabled children to decide what action is in the best interest of their children. >> that all sounds very alarming. keeping them honest, it's not true. the t
santorum led the charge against the u.n. treaty and brought his 4-year-old disabled daughter bella to the events and warned it threatened american sovereignty and allow the u.n. to make decisions about disabled children in america. that is not true. here's what senator john kerry said last night. >> well, i have great respect for both rick and his wife karen and their daughter and their family. he's a strong family man. but he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything other this treaty. nothing. >> well, as we told you last night former republican, repeat, republican attorney general testified before the senate foreign relations committee in july basically saying exactly that. there's no nothing in the treaty that interferes with u.s. laws. that didn't stop senator santorum to send out this e-mail. you did it. you
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
16 years without global warming according to u.n. data and we have the absurd spectacle of people claiming acts of congress can control the weather and make hurricanes less nasty and tornadoes less frequent which by the way none of them are showing any trends at all that are unusual. >> okay. bill nye, your response? >> well, we start talking about the facts, the medieval warming period and roman warming period, those are just in europe. let's see if we can agree on a couple things. do you agree that when i was a kid or when you were a kid, there was 340 parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? >> sure. it's rising. what's your point? >> so here's the point, is it's rising extraordinarily fast. that's the difference between the bad old days and now. >> carbon dioxide -- >> much faster than ever in history. >> let him finish, mark. let him finish. >> it's the rate that's of great concern more than the actual -- >> what do you put that rate down to, bill? >> it's human activity. you go back -- this is what i say all the time. you look at the ice and you find bubbles of
to go after the u.n. ambassador who had nothing to do with benghazi and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence she had received and to besmirch her reputation is outrageous. >> since then a couple of other senators besides mccain and graham have spoken out saying rice misled the public. when the american ambassador and three others were killed in the attack in september. the real question here is can she be confirmed? not just because of benghazi but because of her whole body of work as the united nations ambassador? >> well, she does have an unusually large number of enemies on capitol hill because of things that have happened in the past, certainly john mccain because of the campaign. but others that she has antagonized along the way. but what's interesting here is the more republicans are pushing back on this, it puts the president in a position of perhaps he wasn't going to nominate her before but it's almost like he can't back down from the fight now and he needs to spend his political capital on this fight. so the others are probably having the reverse effect of tha
the u.n. ambassador apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they even got a problem with me. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> senator jokingly gave the post to senator john kerry. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> he's also listed as a potential defense tair th secretary. ashton carter is on the list and former nebraska senator chuck hagel, a republican, could reach across the aisle. >> we're in a much stronger position today as a country than we were in '07. >> reporter: treasury secretary tim geithner says he'll stay. jack lew is an eventual replacement. people wondering if he would pick good cabinet members. 58% thought he would. 42% said he would not. emily schmidt, cnn, washington. >> emily, thank you. >>> also in washington, bo is back. front and center on the white house holiday card. michelle obama picked a personal could. it shows bo running across the snowy lawn. she called the moment very surreal. >>> she was married to peter jennings and the late ambassador peter
and zucker will help provide it. when we come back, the susan rice side. are the u.n. ambassador and her critics getting fair coverage? . you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, andtill pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. thor's couture gets the most rewards of any small business credit card. your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics, put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ] starts with ground beef, unions, and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what ma
at the u.n.? is it, 56, tthe vatican, switze, taiwan or bermuda? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go do cnn.com/fareed. you can follow us on twitter and facebook. go to itunes.com/fareed for our podcast. you can get the awudio version for free or buy the video version. this bookweek's book of the wee an inverted system. he inverted the idea what would make a system or country or individual anti-fragile. if you go to our conversation in the last segment you can tell this is a fascinating book from a highly inventive mind. for the last look. a political science professor likes to point out that in democratic nations highways are full of twists and turns to accommodate property and people. in autocratic they are straight because leaders can bulldoze whatever is in the way to get to a straight line. take a look at this interesting twist on that rule. the builders of this highway in china built their road in a straight line but as you can see the road has a house right in the middle of it. the homeowner refused to budge so they built around him. remember in the run up to the be
a short break. i do want to come back and ask you about president obama's u.n. ambassador susan rice. has the benghazi incident ruined her chance to come the next secretary of state? been lying around. secretary of state? 1-ecome the secretary of state? 8034ra, and u tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 find new ways to make your money work harder. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so if you're ready to teach your old 401(k) some new tricks... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 talk to chuck. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k) tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can receive up to $600. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 see schwab.com tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 for terms and conditions. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call, click or visit tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to open an account today. good boy. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. something this delicious could only come from nature. now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discov
a joint u.n. afghan base. it happened in eastern afghanistan. there are no immediate reports of any casualties. the taliban is claiming responsibility for the attack. joining me now by phone from kabul is journalist ben farmer. ben, the attack is being described as, quote, complex. can you walk us through what happened? >> well, it does seem to be complex and ambitious. it began at about 6:00 local time this morning, just after dawn. it began with two suicide car bomb attacks, attacking the gate of the airfield. the vehicles were packed with explosives and driven towards the gate and detonated. followed a wave of suicide attackers armed with assault rifles, some also wearing suicide vests. they started to attack the gate guards and guards on the walls. it was a two-hour fire fight. during that fire fight, helicopters took off from the airfield to join in the battle to fire down on the attackers. the fire fight took about two hours, at the end of which all the attackers were dead. we believe there were about nine in total, including those in the suicide car bombs. now, the coalition
break. i do want to come back and ask you about president obama's u.n. ambassador susan rice. has the benghazi incident ruined her chance to come the next secretary of state? can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. olaf's pizza palace gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! pizza!!!!! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve the most rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laugh
for u.n. affairs at the national security counsel at the time of the genocide. the rwanda genocide. now, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic
kerry is firing back at senator rick santorum. it's all about this. opposition to a u.n. treaty. one that a lot of people thought was a no-brainer. it was about the rights of the disabled all over the world. we brought you this story yesterday. senate republicans rejecting this treaty on tuesday despite the fact that one of their own, bob dole, bob dole, a former majority leader, came to the floor in a wheelchair trying to draw support for this treaty. he was being pushed by his wife and made an impassioned plea. senator santorum explained opposition to this treaty in a piece published in "the daily beast." in part he says this. our nation has been been the worldwide leader when it comes to protecting the disabled. we should be telling the u.n. and not the other way around how to ensure dignity and respect for the disabled. effectively saying nobody tells the united states what to do. it sets a very dangerous precedent perhaps for other things. okay. that sounded legitimate until it came out that that's not what the treaty suggests. senator kerry was mincing absolutely no words in sa
of israel. they need only the majority of the u.n. members to approve. >>> and in the u.s., the kansas city chiefs will play today, despite a personal tragedy for the team. chiefs linebacker eer jovan be shot and killed his girlfriend yesterday before heading to the practice facility where he turned the gun on himself in front of the coach and general manager. >>> more top stories at the top of the hour when "cnn sunday morning" continues. see you then. sanjay gupta m.d. begins right now. >>> hey, there. thanks for being with us. this weekend we're marking world a.i.d.s. day. i'm going to look at a tough issue that might surprise you. question is this, if someone has sex with a partner and doesn't tell them they have hiv, should they be punished? and if so, how? >> plus, a new food trend. i promise you this is healthy. the question is, would you really want a bite of this? >>> first, more than 7 million americans suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, ptsd. the nightmares, flashback, anxiety, it can be debilitating to the point where a normal life is simply impossible. at least half t
be african led and that isn't going happen any time soon. the u.n. peace chief said it won't happen until 2013. that may be too far away to make the difference needed. >>> it is been 489 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. a report says businesses added 118,000 private sector ads in november. >>> and now, hillary for president. 66% of all women and even 23% of republicans give another clinton run the nod. now, she say said she isn't doing to run, but her actions may speak louder than those words. maureen dowd notes she has gathering up the suspects, making speeches about israel, solidifying relationships with democrats in washington. tonight, donna brazile and david frum, former speech writer for george w. bush. donna, you know hillary clinton and you know her so well. the poll numbers look pretty stunning, but you know, it's easy to talk about something in the hypothetical, then someone runs and people start finding out all kinds of bad things about you. what do you think? first of all, there are 1,422 days until the next big presidential election. >> who's counting, donna? >
and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported strongly the position that the united states took on libya because there was an identifiable enemy, and
, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia? and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what's happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. but i think from the administration's point of view, they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out syria, while senator mccain said they need to get involved. what is at stake? >> they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talk about putting american boots on the ground. the question is can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women, and children have been slaughtered and after nearly two years of this administration saying, you know, the assad must step down, and it not happening. the best one can hope for, perhaps, is that some kin
don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then
by the regime and the u.n. says more than 2.5 million people have been forced from their homes. blasts like this have become commonplace in places across syria, but the red line has always been the use of chemical weapons by assad's forces. >> we have set an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line and those responsible would be held to account. >> if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> held accountable. it's unclear exactly what that means, but what about military intervention to stop the assad regime. >> the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. there will be consequences. if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event of credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people. but suffice to say, we are certainly planning to take action, if that eventuality were to occur. >> a p
critical of rice following the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they got a problem with me. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secreta secretary. >> reporter:. i. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> reporter: it is a list that includes michelle flournoy who held the number three job at the pentagon. ashton carter is on the list, and former nebraska senator chuck hagel, a republican, could represent a reach across the aisle. >> we're in a much stronger position today as a country than we were in '07. >> reporter: treasury secretary tim geithner said he will stay at his post until at least inauguration. president obama's chief of staff jack lew is often named as a possible replacement. a poll asked if president obama would pick good cabinet members. 58% said they thought he would. 42% said he would not. emily schmidt, cnn, washington. >> you can read more about the president's potential choices for
. brazilia was inaugurated in april of 1960. he also designed that most international of buildings, the u.n. headquarters in new york city. thanks for being part of my program this week. i will see you next week. >>> hello, i'm alison kosik with a check of our top stories. going over the fiscal cliff could send the u.s. economy into verse. christine lagarde spoke with candy kroll crowley about how a needs to be hammered out. >> the best way to go forward is to have a balanced a i approach that takes into account both increasing the revenue, which means either raising tax or creating new sources of revenue and cutting spendings as well. >> the imf has a real interest in how the u.s. economy is doing because it will d
bank and east jerusalem as a punitive measure after palestinians won a bid for upgraded status at the u.n. building here would link the settlement with jerusalem, a move the palestinians say would essentially cut the west bank in half and cut them off from what they hope will be the capital of any future palestinian state, east jerusalem. >> there is no chance for a palestinian state. it's impossible. i mean, anyone who would look at the maps, look at the geography would know exactly that this decision means that no more two-state solution. >> the israeli government says it believes the palestinians breached international treaties by going to the u.n. m first place and the decision to move ahead with the settlement construction is a direct response. israel's announcement to settle in the e1 area of the west bank has led to harsh reactions both from the united nations as well as countries around the world. nevertheless, israel says it stands by its decision and will not be deterred by international pressure. >>> west bank settlements like this one look almost like any other city in israel
north korea north korea. a u.n. report estimates two-thirds of north koreans suffer from chronic food shortage. $100 million, the money spent on the memorials, it-f it was spent on food would have brought enough corn to wipe out north korea's 500 ton food shortfall. most of our talk is about north korea's missiles but tonight's story struck a chord with us showing the greatest wrong done in north korea, aided by other countries, is to north koreans. piers morgan tonight starts now. [ male announcer ] introducing... a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. [ ding! ] losing your chex mix too easily? time to deploy the boring-popcorn decoy bucket. then no one will want to steal the deliciousness. with
. why the senate would vote down a u.n. treaty to support universal rights for the disabled. but they did, 38 senators voted no. some of the so-called facts about the treaty are simply fabrications. ahead on the program, pretty spirited discussion. i interview one of the senators who voted no. senator mike lee. i confront him about those facts. also former u.s. attorney general dick thornburg, a republican, who has a disabled child and still holds out hope the treaty will pass. >>> plus, a legal battle to tell you about over 21-month-old child named talia. her mother gave her up for adoption without the father's knowledge or permission while he was away from home serving in the military. now he wants talia back. the child's fate hinges on a judge's decision. we'll tell you how the why you ruled and speak with talia's dad. those stories and landmark cases making it to the supreme court. it will decide the issue of same sex marriage. all that ahead along with the "ridiculist." >> "360" coming up in ten minutes. >>> our fifth story "outfront" tragedy in london. a nurse at the h
on the agenda when u.s. and russian officials met in geneva today with the u.n. peace envoy. reports say after 21 months of relentless bloodshed, they agreed it was still possible to find a political solution to the crisis. but russian foreign minister sergei lavrov insisted the meeting did not mean moscow's support for syrian president bashar al assad is weakening. fierce fighting threatening to engulf the city of damascus. >>> as that battle for the capital intensifies, the stakes are getting higher in syria, and the regime is getting even more desperate. the pentagon believes government troops have loaded bombs with sarin gas in what may be the last-ditch attempt for president assad to hold onto power. but as barbara starr reports now, a u.s. military strike on syria is not without risk. >> reporter: with the u.s. now believing the syrian government has chemical-filled bombs, cnn has learned the pentagon is secretly updating military strike options for president obama in the event he orders action. a senior u.s. official tells cnn a strike could be carried out with the ships and aircraft al
neighbor to the north, being turkey. security concerns are prompting the u.n. to announce it is pulling nonessential personnel out of syria. want to bring in fran townsend, our cnn national security contributor and member of the cia external advisory committee. and, fran, good to see you. let's talk about these chemical weapons because we know that in the past, what, three, three have been, i guess, two, two different times the u.s. has seen syria move its chemical weapons around. but intelligence suggests this time the movement is different. how so? >> well, there was an american official speaking on background, obviously, to a new york times reporter who didn't describe this as movement of the chemical weapons. what makes it different this time was it was described as the syrians taking steps in preparation for use. that's far more serious and far more concerning to american and regional officials if syria is undertaking activity that looks like the preparation for the deployment of these chemical weapons. remember, you mentioned, brooke, turkey. also jordan. we have -- there are regi
that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornburg has testified the former attorney general of the united states, there's no legal requirement whatsoever for the united states to change anything. rick santorum was just not factual. what he did, he gave some people here an excuse to hide behind that when they know that there are people who hate the united nations, who don't want any united nations treaty. and so they gave them a reason to be able to say this is why i'm voting against it. we're going to come back with the hearings next year, again that will show people exactly what the facts are. we'll have all the witnesses in. i think it can be december positive. and ultimately, i would be prepared to put into the treaty language of the resolution of ratification language that can make it more clear than it is today if that will satisfy them. >> the other argument that some of these republicans were making at least to me privately over the past few days, when i was beginning to get
at state where she doesn't have a good record and her u.n. record is not good. we don't have time to go through the particulars, but i think senator kerry would not only be the policy and political wiser choice. >> everything i've read about ambassador rice, she's imminently qualified for the job. >> you guys can continue this conversation at home right now. thanks to both of you for joining us. >>> the royal line of succession could soon be adding a new name. britain is buzz right now over the news the royal family is about to add another member. ll t in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >>> catherine duchess of cambridge is pregnant. cnn's royal correspondent max foster is at the epicenter of the madness that's going on right now. the hospital where the duchess has been admitted with acute morning sickness. max, give us the latest. >> reporter: well, i think we're going to be here for months now, wolf. but certainly the kucduchess of
, the u.n. i understand the frustrations of the israelis and the presen situation. but the fact is, when all of that frustration is done, you have to get back to the reality. and the reality is there is only one way of stabilizing the situation and that is getting back to a credible negotiation with a frame work shaping it that allows us to negotiate a two-state solution. i still believe despite people saying there's no way it can happen, it's the only answer. >> is there any hope in the immediate future, those talks, direct face-to-face negotiations between the israelis and palestinians will get off the ground? >> it's possible. we've discussed this many times, wolf. most of the time we've been talking about the latest impact. but president obama has been re-elected here in the u.s. i know he feels deeply about this issue. he regards peace between israelis and palestinians as a genuine strategic interest of the united states. and we're going to have i think a fresh opportunity to go back to this issue to try and grip it and frame it in the right way and we've got to try. i always say to
with the russian foreign minister and the u.n. mediator in syria today in brevlin. >> let's talk about those meetings. >> you can be sure that this issue of chemical weapons will be at the top of the list. >> no question about that. what are the options there? what can the international community do at this point if, in fact, they are already in a position where they're loading these components on to the weapons? >> well, one is this public message from the united states, from the nato secretary general and from the russians. the syrian government, including assad personally, will be held accountable. second is perhaps to see if the russians can use their influence. they're the big egest arms supplier to syria, the biggest ally that syria has, to dissuade the syrians from letting this chemical weapons loose or using them against the rebel alliance. if assad should fall and there's a chaotic period of time where no one is in charge of the government in damascus, if one of those radical rebel groups gets control of chemical weapons, that could be potentially very, very dangerous and that might
that is occurring and they're now too afraid to return. u.n. secretary general ban ki moon visited this refugee camp in jordan, this is yesterday, and or own cnn's ivan watson is in a sprawling refugee camp on the border with turkey. >> reporter: we're in a camp of around 7,000 syrians on the edge of syria. these people, some of them have been waiting a month, two months to be allowed into turkey. turkey says its refugee camps are full right now. these people have been supplied tents. they get about two meals, hot meals, a day, but everybody here complains that the water is seeping into their tents, and none of these tents really have heat either, so you can see how people are trying to heat up their tea and water, making fires right outside these shelters. now, this is just a fraction of the hoards of people who have been displaced by the conflict in syria. we don't really know the numbers of displaced people inside syria. the united nations says close to half a million have been pushed outside of the country to neighboring countries, like iraq, lebanon, turkey, jordan. the united nations secretary
for syria back on track, a u.n. effort that's stalled for so many months now. there's not a lot of hope it will get back on track anytime soon. a lot of international powers and pressure being put on syria to try to comply with some sort of peace plan so this nightmare scenario doesn't come to any sort of fruition. zoraida? >> all right, we're talking about a deadly nerve gas, it is sarin. can you tell us what kind of damage could this do to the people there? >> reporter: it's well known that sarin and the use of sarin is a nightmare scenario. the use of it could kill a huge amount of people in a very short amount of time. now, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporte
as the u.n. envoy to syria. with so much concern about the threat of chemical weapons at this point, do you think there are any diplomatic options left? >> i think the play -- and hillary clinton met twice today with russian foreign minister lavrov -- is to get russia in the tent with the rest of the world. everyone has predicted, when facts on the ground change, russia will be there. this could be a reset moment for vladimir putin, and he could, because of his unique sway in the area, persuade, i would think, the bashar family to step aside and create a peaceful transition, like the transition in yemen. the opposition is now more broadly representative, and i would hope the russians would see that being on the wrong side of this just creates more carnage, more opportunity for terrorists to get traction there and won't help russia. >> it's a pivotal moment, as we say, a clear tipping point. glad you're back safe and sound from egyp. jane harman, thanks so much for coming in. the jersey shore about to meet the fiscal cliff. grim news for governor christie as he visits washington. >>> plus th
-american lyrics in 2004. text of the lyrics refsurfaced n lyric's ireport calling for the death of u.s. soldiers. psy wrote the controversial lyrics. he did write them. another south korean rock band penned the words for their song "dear america" but psy was one of three performers rapping the lyrics on stage. he did write them or he did not write them? he did not write them. okay. so he did it on stage. let's bring in dean obeidallah in los angeles. we did our moment of the week first because you were having problems with your earpiece. it's live tv. you have an issue. it's not a big deal. it works, all right? >> exactly. >> dean on the phone and on tv, should he be held accountable for another band's lyrics he rapped back in 2004 or are people orr reacting about artistic freedom? >> honestly if he had not apologized, if he stood up for those lyrics and that's what he really still feels now, that american troops should be killed, people are right by protesting. time has passed. he said he's performed for the u.s. troops. he's sincerely apologetic. some will forgive him and some will not. those
. u.s. court of appeals for the armed services says the judge showed bias when he ordered h hasan be forcibly shaved before his court-martial. hasasm n argued that he grew a beard in accordance with his muslim faith and the order violated his religious freedom. with the san antonio express news, joining us this morning. welcome. >> thank you. >> i thought it was against army regulations to have facial hair. >> it generally is. the regulation is so strict, in fact, that most of the people i've known in the military don't even wear mustaches. and when they did, they were in the war zone. for example, invasion of iraq, one of my buddies wore a pretty thick mustache. that was out of regulation but no one cares when you're in the war zone. at fd hood, that's a different matter. people are very generally very careful about it and there have been no exceptions as far as i know for muslims. there have been some for seikhs. but there's a very complicated process for that. >> so why did the court of appeals rule that the judge was wrong in this case to force this guy to shave his beard off?
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)